| 16th July 2002 | Modified: 14th October 2014 | Christianity, News Releases | Seen 21 times

16 July
Jul 16
16th July 2002

Catholic Archbishop attacks hospital's "arrogant and unacceptable"  
behaviour.  

Following authorisation by the HFEA (Human Fertilisation and Embryology  
Authority), Glasgow Royal Infirmary became the first hospital in Scotland  
able to carry out PGD (Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis) or genetic embryo  
screening, earlier this year.  

At the time the hospital spoke of establishing an "Ethics Committee" to  
advise on this work. Investigations by the Catholic Church revealed the  
committee was not in place but being assembled. After more than four months  
of procrastination and delay, the hospital trust released the following  
statement on 11 July:  

The Trust can call on a number of people should the need arise to convene a  
committee to consider any ethical issues relating to assisted conception.  
These people come from a range of backgrounds and include both professional  
and lay members. The Trust has no intention of disclosing the identity of  
these individuals, given the sensitivities around this matter and the real  
sense of threat that individuals in the field have, due to recent local and  
international events.  
Ends.  
Sandra Moir  
Communications Manager  
North Glasgow University Hospitals NHS Trust  
Stobhill Hospital  
t - 0141 201 4314  
f - 0141 201 4202  
e - sandra.moir@northglasgow.scot.nhs.uk  


The following statement has been released by Archbishop Mario Conti,  
Archbishop of Glasgow and member of the Catholic Bishops joint bioethics  
committee:  

"This response by the The North Glasgow NHS Trust is both unacceptable and  
arrogant.  

Genetic screening is an area of enormous concern to the the public, with  
serious moral and ethical implications. The North Glasgow NHS Trust is a  
publicly funded and supported organisation that exists to serve the people  
of Glasgow and beyond.  

It is completely unacceptable for Glasgow Royal Infirmary to refuse to  
disclose the names of those who may advise their medical staff in this  
publicly funded work. At the same time, it is disingenuous in the extreme to  
suggest that any threat or hint of threat exists in relation to those who  
simply give advice on ethics.  

The response by the Trust begs a number of important questions, namely;  

1. Several months after a licence was granted for PIGD work, why does  
Glasgow Royal Infirmary not have a properly constituted, permanent ethics  
committee to advise on and oversee this work?  

2. Why is the Trust apparently unprepared to assure the public on a matter  
of widespread concern that it will publicly nominate persons of competence  
in the moral and ethical fields concerned?  

3. Is the Trust ready to accept nominations from churches or church bodies  
which have the traditional competence to deal with or offer advice on these  
issues?"  

Note: Archbishop Conti gave this statement from Lourdes in France where he  
has just arrived with a diocesan pilgrimage, comprising a number of sick and  
ill people from Glasgow and the west of Scotland, who were being cared for  
by others who had given up their time to do so. He said this "stressed the  
importance given to such work by the church and reinforces our belief that  
the dignity of the individual does not depend upon their physical perfection  
but on the range of relationships they are capable of having with other  
human beings."  

ENDS  

Peter Kearney  
Catholic Media Office  
0141 221 1168  
pk@scmo.org  

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