| 31st August 2005 | Modified: 16th October 2014 | Christianity, News Releases | Seen 30 times

31 August
Aug 31
31st August 2005

Museum exhibition celebrates Scottish-German links.  

A new exhibition at a Scottish Catholic museum in Aberdeen will highlight  
the town's longstanding links with the city of Regensburg in Germany. A  
Press preview of the exhibition at the Blairs Museum in Aberdeen will be  
held on Thursday 1st September at 12.30pm.  

The Scottish Benedictine monastery of St James in the German town of  
Regensburg gained universal attention last April when Pope Benedict XVI  
chose to put the scallop pilgrim shell of St James on his coat of arms.  

He admitted later that he did this, in part, because of the spiritual links  
he felt he had with this ancient Scottish Monastery.  

Now the city of Aberdeen is celebrating fifty years of twinning between  
Aberdeen and Regensburg (in English Ratisbon).  

For many hundreds of years, Scots from the North East received their  
education at St James Abbey. To mark the occasion the Museum of the former  
Scottish Junior Seminary of Blairs College in Aberdeenshire has built an  
exhibition to co-incide with these events and depict the lives and  
achievements of some of the sons of the Diocese of Aberdeen from the North  
East shores.  

The exhibition tells the tale of Ninian Winzet, the priest school master of  
Linlithgow who was a fugitive in Ratisbon following the Scottish Reformation  
of 1560.  

He ended up as the first Abbot of Ratisbon. Starting with an empty  
monastery, he soon had six Scottish monks with him living the Benedictine  
way of life and training others to return to Scotland to re-convert the  
native land.  

Ninian Winzet, the priest school master of Linlithgow who was a fugitive in  
Ratisbon following the Scottish Reformation of 1560.  

Starting with an empty monastery, he soon had six Scottish monks with him  
living the Benedictine way of life with the eventual aim of training others  
to return to Scotland to re-convert the native land.  

The exhibition pays tribute to Abbot Placid Fleming who was Abbot of  
Ratisbon for forty-seven years until 1720. He was described by leading  
monastic historian Abbot Mark Dilworth as Å’the greatest man produced by the  
Scottish monasteries in Germany ¹. He was a naval officer before becoming a  
Catholic, and reached Ratisbon by way of the Scots College in Rome. After  
long campaigning and fund-raising Fleming finally opened the seminary which  
his predecessors had imagined. Boys from Scotland received high quality  
education there and some returned as priests.  

The displays trace the history of Ratisbon until about 1850 and explain how  
all German monasteries were closed because of Napoleonic rule on Europe in  
1802. Ratisbon however managed to survive.  

The exhibition will be formally opened on Sunday 4th September and will run  
for the month of September when the museum will close its doors for the  
season.  

The Rt. Rev. Peter Moran, Bishop of Aberdeen said,  
˜This exhibition coincides with the City Of Aberdeen s celebration of 50 years  
of twinning with Regensburg and I am delighted that the Blairs Museum is  
staging this exhibition marking the historic links between the North East  
and Regensburg that have been in existence for many hundreds of years."  

Blairs Museum is situated 5 miles South West of Aberdeen on the South  
Deeside Road (B9077). It is open at weekends and at times outwith the  
weekend by appointment. Opening times are Saturday 10.00am to 5.00pm, Sunday  
12noon to 5.00pm. The contact person is David Taylor, Museum Manager. tel  
01224 863767.  
E Mail, manager@blairsmuseum.com.  

ENDS  


Peter Kearney  
Director  
Catholic Media Office  
5 St. Vincent Place  
Glasgow  
G1 2DH  
0141 221 1168  
pk@scmo.org  
www.scmo.org  

Note to editors: You are invited to a Press preview of the exhibition which  
will be held on Thursday 1st September at 12.30pm. The contact person is  
David Taylor, Museum Manager. tel 01224 863767.  
E Mail, manager@blairsmuseum.com.  

------ End of Forwarded Message  

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