scmo_banner_news.jpg


Christianity in Scotland ­  More than just a lifestyle choice? What role now for the Churches in contemporary Scotland?

Venue: Glasgow Royal Concert Hall
Date: Tuesday 27 May
Time 7.00 pm
Ticket price £5 (concessions £3.50)
Box office: Tel 0141 353 8000

Christianity in Scotland ­  More than just a lifestyle choice? What role now for the Churches in contemporary Scotland?

As church attendance figures continue to fall The Saltire Society investigates the role of the Christian Churches in today's society. Does the Church still have a central role in the life of the population of Scotland or is it at worst an irrelevance, at best just another lifestyle choice? Is Scotland slipping down the route to Pagan society or do we still enjoy an active religious community? And for those in our country who do still hold on to 'Church' values how do they weigh up modern living with Christian responsibility? Could they find spiritual awareness outwith organised religion? Does the voice of the various Church establishments reflect the voice of the people and should that voice still have a place in public and political life?

On 27th May at 7.00 pm Harry Reid, former editor of The Herald newspaper and Life and Work and author of 'Outside Verdict: an old kirk in a new Scotland' will chair a far-reaching Saltire Society/Herald public debate on these issues in Glasgow's Royal Concert Hall. The speakers selected for the panel offer feisty fare. Names to juggle the continuing arguments on the future of the Church include: Calum Brown, Professor of Religious and Cultural history at the University of Strathclyde; Peter Kearney, Director of the Catholic Media Office and Vice President of the Catholic Communications Commission; Alastair McIntosh, Scottish writer, social activist, broadcaster and campaigning academic from the Isle of Lewis and Fellow of the Edinburgh-based Centre for Human Ecology; and George Rosie, journalist, writer and broadcaster. The debate is an opportunity to test the ecclesiastical pulse rate and hear some of the finest minds discuss the society we find ourselves in today.

'During the time of Kirk you scarcely see any body in the streets, or loitering away the time of prayer in wantonness and excess; though, at other times . . . there is no crime they would scruple to commit. To be seen in the street after the summons of the bell, or to read any book which has no relation to religion, seems wicked and abominable to the most abandoned.' Letters from Edinburgh, (Published London 1776)

The Saltire Society is a campaigning organisation working to promote the very best in Scottish cultural life. The public face of this work is the body of Awards presented by the Society every year including awards for art and architecture, literature, civil engineering, housing design, science, film and overall contribution to Scottish life.

Ends.

 

Prepared for The Saltire Society by Jan Rutherford Publicity & The Printed Word

Tel: 0131 337 9724
Fax: 0131 623 1244
Email:  jan.ppw@blueyonder.co.uk

Who are the speakers?

Harry Reid ­ Chairing the panel

Journalist and writer Born in Glasgow, brought up in Aberdeen, graduated from Oxford University (BA Hons). One of the UK's finest journalists.

Career.

  • The Scotsman 1969-1981 (Features Editor, 1977-1981)
  • Sunday Standard (Sports Editor, 1981-1982)
  • The Herald (Executive Editor, 1982-1984) (Deputy Editor, 1984-1997) (Editor, 1997 -2000)

Current Chairman, Scottish Editors' Committee of the SDNS.

Books.  
Outside Verdict: an old kirk in a new Scotland (2002); "The Glasgow Herald" Book of Scotland   (1990); Dear Country: a Quest for England (1992)

 

George Rosie:
Journalist, writer and broadcaster. Born, raised educated and based in Edinbugh.

Television. Reporter Channel Four series Down the Line, 1986-87, Scottish Eye, 1988. Reporter/writer Scottish Television series: The Englishing of Scotland, 1988; Selling Scotland, 1989; Scotching the Myth, (winner of best documentary Celtic Television Festival),1990; Losing the Heid, 1991; Independence Day, 1998; Secret Scotland, 1997-98; Our Friends in the South, 1998; Six Moments in History, 2002, Ghosts in Glass, 2002. Associate producer ITV network series Out of the Shadows, Its Our Treasury, 1997. Producer Channel Four Dispatches Something In The Air, 1998. Associate producer/ reporter ITV network programme After Lockerbie, 1998 (winner of best documentary British Academy of Film & Television Arts, 1999; silver medal of New York International Film and Television Festival 1999). Writer STE/C4/RTE co production Celtic America, 2000.

Journalism. Sub-editor D.C. Thomson & Co. Editor, Interior Design magazine, 1966-68. Freelance magazine writer, 1968-76. Scottish Affairs Correspondent, Sunday Times, 1976-86. Founding editor Observer Scotland, 1988-89. Deputy editor Sunday Herald, 1999. As contributor: Nova, The Guardian, New Society, New Statesman, The Scotsman, The Herald, Sunday Herald, Sunday Times, Granta among others. Award winner RSPB birds and countryside award, 1988.

Drama. Stage plays: The Blasphemer, 1990; Carlucco and the Queen of Hearts, 1991 (winner Evening News National Award, Scotsman Fringe First, Independent Theatre Award, Guardian Critics Award); Taking Stock, 1993; It Had To Be You, 1994. Radio plays: The Blasphemer, 1991; The Parsi, 1993; Postcards from Shannon, 2000 (nominated as BBC entry into Prix Italia and Prix Europa for 2000). BBC Radio Scotland documentary series The Witness, 2002.

Books. The British in Vietnam, 1970. Cromarty, 1975. The Ludwig Initiative, 1978. Hugh Miller, 1982. The Directory of International Terrorism, 1986. As
contributor: Headlines, the Media in Scotland, 1978; Scotland, Multinationals and the Third World, 1982; The Scottish Government Year Book, 1982; Sunday Times Insight Book on The Falklands War, 1982. Sunday Times Insight Book Strike!, 1985. World Offshore Oil and Gas Report, 1987. Anatomy of Scotland,1992. Anatomy of the New Scotland, 2002. Secret Times, to be published by Granta Books in 2003. Recipient of Scottish Arts Council writers' bursary for novel Death's Enemy, the Pilgrimage of Victor Frankenstein. Published by William Heinemann in November, 2001, paperback version by Vintage, 2002. Currently working on second novel.

 

 

Alastair McIntosh
Background and Education
   
Born and brought up in a Hebridean crofting community on the Isle of Lewis, attending Leurbost School in the village and then the Nicolson Institute in Stornoway. Graduated 1977, University of Aberdeen, with a Degree of Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Geography, submajoring in Psychology and Moral Philosophy. Graduated 1981, University of Edinburgh, Degree of Master of Business Administration (MBA), specialising in Accountancy, Finance & Investment and Management Science.
   
Principal Posts
   
1977-1980 ­Deputy-Head, St Peter's Extension School, VSO, Gulf Province, Papua New Guinea 1981-1984 - Scottish Organiser, Lepra: British Leprosy Relief Association, Edinburgh 1984-1986 - Financial Advisor, South Pacific Appropriate Technology Foundation, P. Moresby, PNG 1986-1990 - Business Advisor to the Iona Community; and, simultaneously, Co-Director, Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific 1990-1996 - Teaching Director (initiating and running the MSc degree and PhD
supervision) Centre for Human Ecology, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Edinburgh 1996-2001 - Joseph Rowntree funded Fellow of the Centre for Human Ecology (Open University) 2001                  - Executive Director, Centre for Human Ecology (an interim troubleshooting post) 2002-now  - Freelance Fellow of the Centre for Human Ecology (now an independent, Open University-accredited institute) including student thesis supervision, course teaching and developing a new MSc-level module on Spiritual Activism: Leadership as Service; more generally, a campaigning academic, lecturer, speaker, writer and broadcaster.  
 

Books, Papers and Articles
   
Some 150 articles in journals including The Ecologist, Resurgence, Interculture (French/English), Accounting, Business & Financial History, Environmental Values, Edinburgh Review, Scottish Affairs, Cencrastus, Oceania (Sydney Uni. Dept. of Anthropology), Ecos: Brit. Assoc. Nature Conservationists, Psychoenergetic Systems, Fishing News, Fishing Monthly, Journal of Law & Religion, Ecotheology, Theology in Scotland, Bres (Holland), Encyclopaedia of Nature and Religion, Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, United Nations Proceedings, The Herald, Scotsman, Guardian, Le Monde Diplomatique ­ see www.AlastairMcIntosh.com/publications.htm . Books are:
   
Marketing: A Handbook for Charities, Directory of Social Change, London, 1984 A Basic PR Guide for Charities, Directory of Social Change, London, 1986 Healing Nationhood: Essays on Spirituality, Place and Community, Curlew, Kelso, 2000 Soil and Soul: People versus Corporate Power, Aurum Press, London, 2001
   
"This is a world-changing book, one of the most important I have ever read, which will transform our perception of ourselves, our history and our surroundings Ã…   the work of a great thinker and a great poet" - George Monbiot, author of Captive State in his Foreword to Soil and Soul
   
"This has to be the book of the decade. Lyrical, passionate and poetic. McIntosh's writing is truly compelling" ­ Sunday Herald; "Terrific book" ­ The Guardian; "Gripping" ­ The Observer
   
Major Broadcasts  
   
Fifth Estate CBC Canadian TV documentary on American-Scottish native land rights, 1994 To the Best of our Knowledge 30 minute Ian Flemming interview about cultural healing on US public radio, networked to some 140 stations, 1996 Filthy Rich, Channel 4 TV documentary about Eigg land reform, 1996 The Whole Shebang (3), BBC 2 TV documentary on my work with cultural healing, 2002 Changing Places: Boats of Hope, BBC Radio 4 documentary on the GalGael Trust, 2003 Voices for Peace (presenting), 4-part BBC Radio Scotland series on Sri Lanka, Northern Ireland, Israel/Palestine and South Africa (with Archbishop Desmond Tutu), 2003
   
Other Recent Achievements and Activities
   
I was a founding and community-elected trustee of the Isle of Eigg Trust (for land reform), a founding trustee of the GalGael Trust (for cultural
regeneration) in Glasgow, and a founding Fellow of the Open-University accredited Centre for Human Ecology. I played a leading role in the campaign that stopped the proposed Lafarge-Redland Isle of Harris superquarry. I speak/run workshops around the world on spirituality, ecology, community and management For 5 years commencing 1998 I have been invited to address 400 senior officers from 60 countries at the Joint Services Command and Staff College, Britain's military staff college. I am an advisor to Dmitry Lvov, head of the Department of Economics, Russian Academy of Sciences, on land reform, and in February 2000 gave seminars at the Academy, in the Duma, and for leading Orthodox theologians at the Holy Trinity Sergyev Monastery near Moscow. I am a special advisor on "Combating Islamophobia" with Glasgow Central Mosque. I have initiated and researched for Scotland's 1999 national values discernment project, People and Parliament, in association with the new Scottish Parliament, and follow-up studies on ethnicity and belonging through the Centre for Human Ecology. I am a contributor to the World Council of Churches' Decade for Overcoming Violence, a Quaker, and an Honorary Fellow of the Schumacher Society.

 

Peter Kearney
Brought up in Stirling and educated at St Modan's High School. Graduated from the University of Glasgow (MA Hons ­ Politics).

Now: Director of the Catholic Media Office in Glasgow and Vice President of the Catholic Communications Commission.

Formerly: Convener, Archdiocese of Glasgow's Social Communications Commission.

Peter is married with three children.

 

Calum Brown
Professor of Religious and Cultural history at the University of Strathclyde

 

Catholic Media Office
0141 221 1168

Subscribe to Updates

Subscribe to:
Like   Back to Top   Seen 107 times   Liked 0 times

Subscribe to Updates

If you enjoyed this, why not subscribe to free email updates ?

Subscribe to News updates

Enter your email address to be notified of new posts:

Subscribe to:

Alternatively, you can subscribe via RSS

‹ Return to News

We never share or sell your email address to anyone.

I've already subscribed / don't show me this again

Recent Posts

Bishop calls on UK Government to sign and ratify Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

| 25th May 2018 | Blogging

25 May 2018   Bishop William Nolan, Bishop of Galloway and President of the Justice and Peace Commission of the Bishops Conference of Scotland, will tomorrow (Saturday 26 May) at 12 noon join other Church leaders and campaigners in calling for the Secretary of State to sign and ratify the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.   Taking part in the Pentecost Witness at Faslane Naval Base alongside representatives of the Church of Scotland and Scottish Episcopal Church, Bishop Nolan will call on the Secretary of State to urgently develop and publish a transition plan so that the UK is ready to sign and ratify the Treaty.   Commenting ahead of the event tomorrow, Bishop Nolan said:   “We believe in the dignity and right to life of every human being. The threat of nuclear arms poisons the soul of humanity, and their use by any state or leader would be an immoral act against humanity and against God’s creation.”   The Treaty opened for signature at the United Nations on 20 September 2017. Once ratified, it will make the possession, use and threat of use of nuclear weapons illegal under international law.   ENDS   Peter Kearney  Director  Catholic Media Office  5 St. Vincent Place  Glasgow  G1 2DH  0141 221 1168 07968 122291  pk@scmo.org www.scmo.org Notes to Editors: 1. Full text of the letter sent to the Secretary of State is copied below 2. An image of Bishop Nolan is available at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/139632090@N07/25508101134/in/album- 72157666531058155/ Full text of Letter Dear Secretary of State, As you are aware, the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons opened for signature at the UN on 20 September 2017. Once ratified, this treaty will make the possession use and threat of use of nuclear weapons illegal under international law. We believe in the dignity and right to life of every human being and that nuclear weapons violate that dignity and threaten that life. It is evident that the use of nuclear weapons would have indiscriminate and devastating humanitarian consequences that would extend beyond the borders of any single nation state. The World Council of Churches has stated ‘that as long as such weapons exist, they pose a threat to humanity and to creation’. Pope Francis has condemned not just the threat of use, but the possession of nuclear arms as they serve to create a culture of fear for all humankind and consume vast amounts of human and financial resources that could be better used for human development. The threat of nuclear arms poisons the soul of humanity, and their use by any state or leader would be an immoral act against humanity and against creation. Those signing the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons agreed not to develop, test, produce, manufacture, acquire, possess, stockpile, transfer or receive nuclear weapons. The 122 governments so far who have signed the Treaty recognise along with countless numbers of people throughout the world that we have lived with these weapons for far too long and that they must now be outlawed and eliminated. Successive governments of both major parties have affirmed their commitment to multilateral disarmament for the last 50 years, however the decision by Parliament to spend billions of pounds renewing the UK’s arsenal of mass destruction in times of austerity is not a commitment to peacebuilding and is contrary to our commitments under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. The British Government, by signing the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, would be taking a positive step towards fulfilling those commitments. We, the undersigned, ask you to urgently develop and publish a transition plan so that the UK is ready to sign and ratify the treaty at the earliest opportunity. We pledge to continue to do our part to realise a world without nuclear weapons. Bishop William Nolan President of the Scottish Catholic Bishops’ Justice and ...

New Safeguarding Manual comes into force

| 21st May 2018 | Blogging

In a letter sent to all Catholic parishes over the weekend, Bishop Joseph Toal, who is responsible for Safeguarding on behalf of the Bishops ofScotland,has marked the publication of new national Safeguarding standards which come into force on Monday 21stMay.   In his letter, Bishop Toal commends the publication of ‘In God’s Image’, a new and extensive manual which offers comprehensive guidance and instruction on every aspect of Safeguarding in the Catholic Church.   On behalf of all the Bishops of Scotland, he writes:   “Your Bishops want you to know that we aspire to the highest standards of care and protection of all, and we are committed to rebuilding trust and confidence in the ways in which we ensure that children, young people and vulnerable adults are kept safe.”   The publication of these new materials marks the end of a period in which the Church has been implementing the recommendations of the McLellan Commission that reported in 2015, with rigorous oversight by an Independent Review Group chaired by Baroness Helen Liddell.   Bishop Toal states that engagement with survivors will continue to be an important task for the Church:   “For some years now, each Bishop has been meeting with survivors and will continue to do so. Given the profound and sensitive nature of this issue, such encounters take place discreetly, at times and paces suited to the needs of survivors.”   Adding:   “Through the protection and care we show to all, and through the compassion, healing and justice we offer to those who have survived abuse, we must continue to renew, rebuild and restore faith and hope in the church by offering faith and hope to one another. “   ENDS   Peter Kearney  Director  Catholic Media Office  5 St. Vincent Place  Glasgow  G1 2DH  0141 221 1168 07968 122291  pk@scmo.org  www.scmo.org     Notes to Editors:   The new manual can be viewed here:    https://ingodsimage.bcos.org.uk/      Full text of the letter sent to parishes is copied below.   Pastoral Letter for distribution to Congregations on Pentecost Sunday 2018   My Dear People,   I write, on behalf of all the Bishops of Scotland, to draw your attention to the publication of our Church’s new Safeguarding materials which come into force on 21stMay 2018.  These include ‘In God’s Image’, the document which offerscomprehensive guidance and instruction on every aspect of Safeguarding, including compliance with new Safeguarding standards.  This hasbeen shaped by the recent experience and developing expertise of those involved in the front line of Safeguarding in the Church, both in Scotland and internationally.In ratifying this publication, the Bishops have taken the opportunity to repeat and renew apologies made to those who have suffered any form of abuse, at any time, by anyone representing the Church.     Your Bishops want you to know that we aspire to the highest standards of care and protection of all, and we are committed to rebuilding trust and confidence in the ways in which we ensure that children, young people and vulnerable adults are kept safe.  We are most grateful to the teams of Safeguarding personnel in all Dioceses and to over 9,000 trained volunteers who support the work of parishes and religious congregations across Scotland.     The publication of these materials marks the end of a period in which the Church has been working quietly, but tirelessly, to implement the recommendations of the McLellan Commission that reported in August 2015.     Since 2013 we have published annual audits of allegations reported to us each year. Last month, we also published a historical review of non-recent cases of abuse, covering the period 1943–2005. The publication of our annual audits, the historical review and our new Safeguarding materials demonstrate our ongoing commitment to openness and transparency.     We recognise, however, that pu...

Archbishop Philip Tartaglia backs ‘journalism of moral integrity’

| 10th May 2018 | Blogging

Archbishop Philip Tartaglia, President of the Communications Commission of the Bishops Conference of Scotland, has written to all 500 Catholic parishes this weekend (12/13 May) to mark World Communications Day.     This year, Pope Francis has chosen ‘Truth’ as the theme of his Communications Day message and bemoaned the persistent spread of “fake news”. In his letter, based on the Pope’s theme, Archbishop Tartaglia writes:     “Pope Francis reminds us that Communication is part of God’s plan for us, allowing us to express and share all that is true, good and beautiful.”     Pope Francis has urged Catholics to:     “…contribute to our shared commitment to stemming the spread of fake news and of rediscovering the dignity of journalism and the personal responsibility of journalists to communicate the truth.”     Calling on Catholics to be partners in this quest for truth Archbishop Tartaglia says: “Truth is not just a conceptual reality that regards how we judge things, defining them as true or false. Rather truth involves our whole life…it carries with it the sense of support, solidarity and trust. Journalists are called to be protectors of news and to promote the truth”     ENDS     Peter Kearney  Director  Catholic Media Office  5 St. Vincent Place  Glasgow  G1 2DH  0141 221 1168 07968 122291  pk@scmo.org  www.scmo.org Notes to Editors 1. Full text of Archbishop Targtaglia Letter is copied below. 2. Full text of Pope Francis message for World Communications Day is copied below. My Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ In his message for Communications Sunday this year, Pope Francis reminds us that Communication is part of God’s plan for us, allowing us to express and share all that is true, good, and beautiful. But he warns us, that when we yield to our own pride and selfishness, we can distort our ability to communicate. The capacity to twist the truth is a human failing. Today we are witnessing the spread of what has come to be known as “fake news”. This has caused the Pope to make truth the theme of this year’s communications message, when he urges us to: “contribute to our shared commitment to stemming the spread of fake news and to rediscovering the dignity of journalism and the personal responsibility of journalists to communicate the truth.” The term “fake news” refers to the spreading of disinformation online or in the traditional media based on non-existent or distorted data designed to deceive and manipulate the reader by mimicking real news. Social networks can allow untrue stories to spread so quickly that even authoritative denials fail to contain the damage. Such disinformation can discredit and demonise while fomenting conflict and spreading arrogance and hatred. Preventing and identifying the way disinformation works calls for a profound and careful process of discernment. So how do we defend ourselves? The most radical antidote to the virus of falsehood is purification by the truth. In Christianity, truth is not just a conceptual reality that regards how we judge things, defining them as true or false. Rather, truth involves our whole life. In the Bible, it carries with it the sense of support, solidity, and trust. We discover and rediscover the truth when we experience it within ourselves in the loyalty and trustworthiness of the One who loves us. This alone can liberate us, as in the words of the Gospel according to John: "The truth will set you free". To discern the truth, we need to discern everything that encourages communion and promotes goodness. I would like to quote at length from the Pope’s message and urge you to read his text in full which is available on the website of the Catholic Media Office at www.scmo.org. The Pope says; 'The best antidotes to falsehoods are not strategies, but people: people who are not greedy but ready to listen, people...

Archbishop Leo Cushley celebrates first ever Mass in Scottish Parliament

| 28th March 2018 | Blogging

28 March 2018     Today, 28 March, at 12.30pm Archbishop Leo Cushley, Archbishop of St Andrews & Edinburgh, will celebrate what is believed to be the first ever Mass in the Scottish Parliament. All MSPs are invited to attend mass, which takes place during Holy Week.     Commenting on the occasion, Anthony Horan, Director of the Scottish Catholic Parliamentary Office said:     ‘The celebration of Holy Mass, the summit of Catholic life, is an opportunity to express prayers for the work of our elected representatives and for the common good of society. Of course, Holyrood means Holy Cross, so in that sense, parliament is a most fitting place for this historic celebration.’       Archbishop Leo Cushley said:     "It is a great privilege to be officially invited to offer Holy Mass within the Scottish Parliament, the first such invitation since the parliament's re-establishment 19 years ago. It is a generous gesture which seems to recognise that Catholics are valued participants in the civic life of contemporary Scotland, where we seek to work with others in advancing the common good."      ENDS   Peter Peter Kearney  Director  Catholic Media Office  5 St. Vincent Place  Glasgow  G1 2DH  0141 221 1168 07968 122291  pk@scmo.org www.scmo.org       Notes to Editors: 1. Images will be available from Paul McSherry on at paul.mcsherry@ntlworld.com or 07770393960....