scmo_banner_news.jpg


Fr. John Paul MacKinnon, parish priest on the island of Barra will urge the island community to come together and pray together this weekend as the islands of Barra & Vatersay struggle to come to terms with “a devastating week”.

 

Preaching at Mass tomorrow (Sunday 28 May) he will say:

 

“A week which began normally for so many has turned out to be real “living nightmare” especially for two of our island families. Today we face the reality that one of our teenage girls- Laura MacIntyre, aged only 15, is in Hospital in Manchester fighting for her life with her parents by her bedside. And sadly another of our beautiful teenage girls- Eilidh MacLeod, aged only 14 has died tragically in Manchester because of the terrible atrocity of the terrorist bombing”

 

Fr. MacKinnon will also say;

 

“I have spoken to both families, to both sets of parents and they have asked me to tell everyone that they are so grateful for all your love and support, prayers and messages. Their hearts are broken, their lives have changed forever but they are lifted up by the love and support of their island and also by the wider world.”

 

While urging parishioners, to “Come together, be together and pray, pray continuously as the early Apostles and followers of Jesus did in their own time of need.” “Praying to the Holy Spirit to come down upon our islands and communities and families and especially upon the MacLeod Family & MacIntyre Family.”

 

Referring to 14 year old Eilidh MacLeod, he will say;

 

“God has a special place for our dear beautiful Eilidh, she will be united forever with God’s Holy Angels. She will forever see the glory of God face to face and will forever be in God’s love. She will forever be loved and remembered by her family and by all her many friends. Our loss is certainly heaven’s gain.”

 

ENDS

Peter Kearney 

Director 

Catholic Media Office 

5 St. Vincent Place 

Glasgow 

G1 2DH 

0141 221 1168

07968 122291 

pk@scmo.org

www.scmo.org

 

Note to editors:

The full text of Fr. MacKinnon’s homily is shown below, together with additional prayers which will be used.

 

7th SUNDAY OF EASTER- YEAR A- 2017

 

Last Thursday was “Ascension Thursday” and on Ascension Thursday Jesus told his followers, “know that I am with you always, yes to the end of time”. That was the promise of our Lord Jesus as he ascended into heaven- to be with us always- and we need to know that and we need to remind ourselves of that truth “Jesus is with us always especially in our times of need”.

 

Our islands of Barra & Vatersay have had a devastating week. A week which began normal for so many but has turned out to be real “living nightmare” especially for two of our island families. Today we face the reality that one of our teenage girls- Laura MacIntyre, aged only 15, is in Hospital in Manchester fighting for her life with her parents by her bedside. And sadly another of our beautiful teenage girls- Eilidh MacLeod, aged only 14 has died tragically in Manchester because of the terrible atrocity of the terrorist bombing at a music concert. This news has been devastating for our small island community. There are no words to express our sorrow and to try and understand what the MacLeod family and MacIntyre family are going through right now.

 

I have spoken to both families, to both sets of parents and they have asked me to tell everyone that they are so grateful for all your love and support, prayers and messages. Their hearts are broken, their lives have changed forever but they are lifted up by the love and support of their island and also by the wider world.

 

Out of the darkness and badness of the bombing has come the goodness of so many people. So many people throughout the islands and all over the UK and further afield have been touched by our “heart break”- and this has given us all a lift at such a difficult time especially to the MacLeod & MacIntyre Families.

 

At times like this, what do we do? The answer is given in the first reading today of our Mass. In that reading from the Acts of the Apostles- the answer is found. Jesus has ascended to heaven and the apostles are upset; Jesus has gone, they will never see him again but they come together in one place, in one room- the upper room. There in the upper room is everyone, Peter, John, James, Andrew, Philip, Thomas, Bartholomew, Matthew, James, Simon & Jude, other followers  and Mary and other women. They are all there together. And what are they doing? PRAYING.........CONTINUOUS PRAYER.

 

That’s what we must do to! Come together, be together and pray, pray continuously as the early Apostles and followers of Jesus did in their own time of need. It was when all the followers were together in the one room that Jesus sent the Holy Spirit upon his early church. The Spirit of God who gives strength and peace and healing. That’s what we pray for  today. Praying to the Holy Spirit to come down upon our islands and communities and families and especially upon the MacLeod Family & MacIntyre Family. This is an important time of prayer between Ascension Thursday and Pentecost Sunday- 9 days of continuous prayer to the Holy Spirit to strengthen us all at this sad time.

 

This is a very difficult time for our islands- we have faced difficulties and tragedies before on this island but this is something very new and alien to us all- but we have to let our faith guide us and put our hands into God’s hands and pray for God’s healing, peace and love to come down upon us all but especially upon Laura and her family and upon Eilidh and her family.

 

God has a special place for our dear beautiful Eilidh, she will be united forever with God’s Holy Angels. She will forever see the glory of God face to face and will forever be in God’s love. She will forever be loved and remembered by her family and by all her many friends. Our loss is certainly heavens gain.

 

My dear brothers and sisters, today the readings tell us what to do- be together and pray together. Pray continuously in our churches, our homes and in our hearts. Let us today in this Sunday Mass reach out our hearts to the many hearts that are broken because of the terrible atrocity in Manchester.

 

It is a time of prayer and so let our prayers  be directed to the Holy Spirit for us all and for Laura & her family & friends and for Eilidh and her family & friends- “Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful and kindle in them the fire of your love”.

 

BIDDING PRAYERS FOR 7th SUNDAY OF EASTER

We pray for the church, to be a light of God’s love and peace, striving to penetrate the darkness and evil of our world. We pray to the Holy Spirit to guide the church and guide all the faithful to the Risen and Ascended Lord Jesus. LORD HEAR US

 

We pray for peace in our hearts, our homes and our world. We pray for an end to all forms and acts of terrorism. We pray for an end to all wars and fighting in our world. May the Holy Spirit guide all rulers and leaders and all people to be instruments of peace in our World. LORD HEAR US

 

We pray for our islands at this sad and difficult time. We pray to the Holy Spirit to lift us up and help us to support one another and to be a support to all the MacIntyre and MacLeod family at this sad time. LORD HEAR US

 

We pray for our young, we pray especially for the school friends of Eilidh & Laura, we pray for everyone at Castlebay School, teachers, staff and all children. May the Lord Jesus enfold his loving arms around our young at this time of hurt and pain and fill their hearts with peace and healing and love. LORD HEAR US

 

We pray for all who have been affected by the terrible atrocity of the bombing in Manchester last week. We pray for all in Manchester who have been incredible in their help and support to all who needed help. We pray for the work of our police, and paramedics and for all doctors and surgeons and nurses helping all the sick and injured at this time. May they Holy Spirit touch the hearts of all hearts broken at this time and bring God’s healing and peace. LORD HEAR US

 

We pray for Laura MacIntyre, in Hospital just now in Manchester fighting for her life, and remembering all the injured from the bombing, may the Holy Spirit be with the doctors and nurses taking care of them all and may the Holy Spirit give Laura all the strength she needs and also to her parents and family. LORD HEAR US

 

We pray for all our faithful departed and pray for all who died in the bombing- 22 lives were taken that night and in a special way we pray for our own beautiful Eilidh MacLeod, aged only 14, tragically taken from us all. May the Lord Jesus guide Eilidh’s soul to the glory of heaven and to be forever with him in the Glory of God’s Angels and Saints. May Eilidh forever enjoy the love of seeing her Lord in the paradise of heaven and may our Lord bring his healing and peace to the parents and sisters and all family and friends of Eilidh. LORD HEAR US

Subscribe to Updates
Subscribe to:
Like   Back to Top   Seen 59 times   Liked 0 times

Subscribe to Updates

If you enjoyed this, why not subscribe to free email updates ?

Subscribe to News updates

Enter your email address to be notified of new posts:

Subscribe to:

Alternatively, you can subscribe via RSS

‹ Return to News

We never share or sell your email address to anyone.

I've already subscribed / don't show me this again

Recent Posts

Two former Anglicans to be ordained Catholic priests in Scotland

| 2 days ago | Blogging

Two former clergy who served as Anglican ministers will be ordained as Catholic priests this week as part of the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham, set up in 2011 by Pope Benedict to bring former Episcopalian and Anglican clergy and their people into the Catholic Church.     Rev Simon Beveridge who lives near Whithorn in Dumfries and Galloway will be ordained a priest in Whithorn in Galloway by Bishop William Nolan on Thursday 14th December.  Before being received into the Catholic Church he served as a Vicar in the Church of England from 1987 before becoming a Royal Navy Chaplain in 1993 serving with the Commando Royal Marines and latterly as Regional Navy Chaplain (North), based at Faslane on the Clyde.     There is one ‘secret occupation’ that Deacon Beveridge is very proud of.  He was an amateur jockey!  As he explained, “I trained as an amateur jockey at the British Racing School at Newmarket attending the Amateur National Hunt Course, with race horse trainer, Jimmy Frost, enjoying my first full season racing Point to Point 2006-7 and achieved a winner at Wadebridge in Cornwall.   “That season culminated in me representing the Royal Navy in The Grand Military Gold Cup at Sandown Park where I met a spectacular end by being run out into the rails by two loose horses when leading nine lengths clear of the rest of field!  I have firm intentions to provide a home for a couple of retired race horses once our new home, the Mill, is completed and the paddocks are ready.”   The head of the Ordinariate in the UK is Monsignor Keith Newton.  He was a former Church of England Bishop and is married and cannot therefore be a bishop in the Catholic Church.  Although he has the authority of a bishop in many things, he is not able to ordain men to the priesthood and invites other bishops to do so on his behalf.     Monsignor Newton said, “I am delighted by the welcome the Ordinariate has been shown by Bishop Nolan and Archbishop Cushley.  Their willingness to ordain these me on my behalf to serve the Catholic Church in the Ordinariate as well as their understanding of our unique situation and their words of encouragement have been much appreciated and I look forward to being with them for these ordinations.” Fr Beveridge will begin the task of forming an Ordinariate presence in Galloway while assisting, when available, in the parishes of Kirkcudbright, Dalbeattie, Whithorn, Wigtown, Newton Stewart, with Gatehouse of Fleet and Castle Douglas. Rev Cameron Macdonald, who lives in Nairn, was ordained as an Episcopalian minister in 1990 and served at St Columba’s Episcopal Church in Nairn before becoming an Army chaplain in 1995. He served with 3 and 4 Regiment Army Air Corp in Suffolk and then in Croatia as part of the United Nations Peace Keeping Force and later in Germany with the Royal Green Jackets, going on a Tour of Duty to Bosnia. He later served with the 39 Engineers and in Cairo, Gibraltar, America, Oman and Canada. He will be ordained priest on Saturday (16th December) by Archbishop Leo Cushley in St Columba’s, Edinburgh, and will assist Fr Len Black, the senior Ordinariate priest in Scotland, in serving the growing number of Ordinariate people in Scotland. Fr Black said, “This is an exciting time for the Ordinariate in Scotland and having these two new priests working with me will allow us to provide more opportunities for people to experience our unique liturgical traditions which Pope Benedict described as “a prophetic gesture” that would contribute positively to the developing “the restoration of full ecclesial communion in the context of which the mutual exchange of gifts from our respective spiritual patrimonies serves as an enrichment to us all”. ENDS Peter Kearney  Director  Catholic Media Office  5 St. Vincent Place  Glasgow  G1 2DH  0141 221 1168 07968 122291  pk@scmo.org www.scmo.org ...

Catholic Church suggests Hate Crime review, offers opportunity to consolidate rather than separate legislation

| 29th November 2017 | Blogging

Catholic Church suggests Hate Crime review, offers opportunity to consolidate rather than separate legislation     Church comments come in response to the Scottish Government’s Review of Hate Crime legislation, chaired by Lord Bracadale: http://www.gov.scot/About/Review/Hate-Crime-Legislation     The review is charged with considering whether existing hate crime law represents the most effective approach for the justice system to deal with criminal conduct motivated by hatred, malice, ill-will or prejudice.     Commenting on the review, Director of the Catholic Parliamentary Office, Anthony Horan who submitted a detailed response on behalf of the Bishops’ Conference of Scotland said:     “This process is an opportunity, ultimately, to ensure that the legislation is just and that every group is protected. This does not have to be a “zero sum game” where one group “wins” and another “loses” but rather could be an opportunity to rationalise and simplify legislation. A desirable outcome would be a single aggravation such as section 74 of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003. Applied to all protected characteristics equally, it would be a simple and straightforward “message.” which would foster harmony in that all groups would be treated equally in the eyes of the law.”     Mr Horan added;     “It is important that any legislation, preserves judicial discretion recognising that Scotland has a Criminal Justice System populated by highly trained prosecutors and Judges. They are best placed to assess the strengths and weaknesses of individual cases and should be free to do so in the absence of their decision being “politicised” by legislation which creates a perceived “scandal” where none exists.”     The Church response also highlights Scotland’s long history of anti-Catholicism and urges Government recognition be given to the historic roots of present conflicts. Pointing out that for over twenty years successive Scottish Governments have dedicated significant resources into programmes and projects designed to tackle the symptoms of sectarianism. The submission adds, that in the same period the growth in such funding has been matched by an increase in religious hate crime.       The response notes, that “an opportunity exists to acknowledge that anti-Catholic sectarianism is qualitatively and quantitatively different from other types of religious hate crime in Scotland. Instances of anti-Catholicism outnumber all other type of religious hate crime combined, in a country where Catholics represent only 16% of the population. This is a product of the Reformation Parliament of 1560 and its condemnation of Catholic doctrine and worship including the ban on the celebration of all Catholic sacraments. No other religion or belief has ever been so proscribed in Scotland, the legacy of this proscription continues to the present day. A recommendation by this review, that the Scottish Government consider issuing a collective, retrospective apology could go some way towards building, repairing and renewing bonds between communities harmed by historical wrongdoing. It could also be the first step in addressing historical iniquities.”     ENDS     Peter Kearney  Director  Catholic Media Office  5 St. Vincent Place  Glasgow  G1 2DH  0141 221 1168 07968 122291  pk@scmo.org www.scmo.org Note to Editors: The full text of the response to the Hate Crime Review, is shown below: Response ID ANON-T58X-H9EZ-S Submitted to Independent Review of Hate Crime Legislation in Scotland Submitted on 2017-11-22 14:43:00  What do we mean by hate crime legislation and why does it exist?  Do you consider that the working definition, discussed in this chapter, adequately covers what should be regarded as hate crime by the law of Scotland?  Yes Please give reasons for your answer.:  The definition discussed in this chapter is only ...

Archbishop Leo Cushley delivers Time for Reflection in Scottish Parliament

| 28th November 2017 | Blogging

Delivering the Time for Reflection in the Scottish Parliament today, (Tuesday 28 November 2017), Archbishop Leo Cushley, the Archbishop of St. Andrews and Edinburgh celebrated Scotland’s Patron, Saint Andrew.   Commenting on the legacy of St Andrew he said: “the university town, his name, and his flag, all remind us of something that’s been here, doing a lot of good for a lot of people, for many centuries: and that is the civilizing influence of fair laws, of just courts, of a belief in objective truth, of standards of behaviour, of mutual respect, of helping others who need a hand.”   “No matter your beliefs”, he added, “there are still one or two of these things that we can all agree are worth holding on to.”   Commenting on Archbishop Cushley’s reflection, Anthony Horan, Director of the Scottish Catholic Parliamentary Office said:     “As we approach the feast of St Andrew it is fitting that Archbishop Cushley be invited to deliver the Time for Reflection. It is important that as a society we honour our saints and there is no doubt that St Andrew has a special place in Scottish hearts.     “I am personally delighted to see our Catholic bishops in the Scottish Parliament and I am extremely grateful to the Presiding Officer and his team for their warm welcome and kind hospitality. It is also a fitting opportunity to thank all those politicians who work for the common good of our society, particularly our Catholic MSPs who commit themselves to loving service in an increasingly testing environment.”     ENDS   Peter Kearney  Director  Catholic Media Office  5 St. Vincent Place  Glasgow  G1 2DH  0141 221 1168 07968 122291  pk@scmo.org  www.scmo.org Notes to editors: Full text of Archbishop Cushley’s Time for Reflection is copied below. Time for Reflection by Archbishop Leo Cushley As we all know, 30 November, just around the corner, is St Andrew’s Day.  It’s our national day, just as the English choose to celebrate St George, the Irish St Patrick and the Welsh St David. The Welsh found a local lad to celebrate as their national patron; the English have an Armenian soldier, popular among the Crusaders of the high middle ages; the Irish chose a Briton, maybe even from what is now Scotland; and the Scots have a Galilean fisherman.   Who got the best patron? Well, the English picked someone brave and chivalrous; the Welsh picked someone holy; the Irish picked someone fiery and outspoken; and we picked… a fisherman.  Why a fisherman?  Well, I have a theory, and it’s nothing to do with smokies: so, get comfortable, because here it comes.   You see, the English used to have St Peter as their national patron, and he was the first Pope.  At that time, the Scots had St Columba as their national patron; good local choice, but not quite up to competing with the first Pope; so, the Scots changed their national patron to St Andrew.  Now, Andrew wasn’t the first pope, but he was the first man to be called to follow Jesus.  And in the middle ages, that counted for something… Over a thousand years ago, his relics were brought to the town known now St Andrews, and the kings and people of this country built a cathedral in his honour there.  I’m told that, for centuries, St Andrew’s Cathedral was the largest building in the whole of Scotland, and pilgrims came from all over Europe to visit it.   Today, we’re still proud of Andrew, but in a vague, distant way. Yet he, the university town, his name, and his flag, all remind us of something that’s been here, doing a lot of good for a lot of people, for many centuries: and that is the civilizing influence of fair laws, of just courts, of a belief in objective truth, of standards of behaviour, of mutual respect, of helping others who need a hand.  And that’s probably the best thing about having Andrew as national patron: no matter your beliefs, there are stil...

Scottish Bishop to visit Calais migrant camp

| 27th November 2017 | Blogging

Scottish Bishop to visit Calais migrant camp.Bishop William Nolan, Bishop of Galloway, and President of Justice and Peace Scotland, will travel to Calais with Danny Sweeney, Justice and Peace Scotland’s Social Justice Co-ordinator, on 28th and 29th November, to the visit the migrant camp there. The visit is in unity with the work of the Catholic community in Calais, along with many others, and in solidarity with those in Calais seeking asylum and safety from situations of persecution and conflict.The Justice and Peace Scotland representatives will be guests of the Maria Stobkova Catholic Worker House in Calais, where local authorities have imposed measures to limit the distribution of food, provisions for showers, and possession of tents for migrants, to prevent the establishment of another camp.The visit is in response to increasing numbers of predominately unaccompanied young people returning following the destruction of the migrant camp, usually referred to as ‘the jungle’ in October last year. Speaking ahead of the visit Bishop Nolan said;“Though the migrant camp has been removed from Calais, and the media have moved on, there are still vulnerable young people there, unaccompanied children. Our visit is to see at first hand the plight of these children and to highlight the need for the British and French governments to care for them not neglect them.”Danny Sweeney said:“The situation in Calais, and other areas of northern France should be a national shame to the UK. We take in far fewer refugees than other European nations, particularly the countries which border conflict regions who bear the brunt of the current situation. “Pope Francis has recently reminded church and political leaders across Europe that we have to reflect seriously on Jesus’s words ‘I was a stranger, and you welcomed me’. To leave these children forgotten and abandoned in Europe, at risk of abuse, exploitation, and modern slavery is a damning indictment of our country. As we approach the season of Advent, all of us need to remember who we’re seeing when we set up our nativity cribs - a displaced, migrant family searching for shelter, who had to flee the powers of the state to Egypt to keep Jesus safe.”Bishop Nolan is undertaking this visit in order to witness first-hand the work being done to support young migrant and asylum seekers in Calais by the Catholic community and others, and to meet with those living in Calais seeking sanctuary. The visit is also to express solidarity with the young people who appear to have been abandoned by both French and British governments, and raise the profile of this issue in both public and political discourse in Scotland. Bishop Nolan will be joined in Calais by Bishop Paul McAleenan who chairs the English and Welsh Bishops’ Office for Migration Policy.Honor Hania, Chair, Justice and Peace Scotland, said "As a strongly prolife organisation, Justice and Peace Scotland has watched with growing concern the situation for refugees in and around Calais, with especial concern for the children. We hope this visit will raise awareness of their plight and that something positive and practical can be done to help.”Notes to editors:1. For further information, contact: Daniel Sweeney - on 07891579831 oroffice@justiceandpeacescotland.org.uk Tel : 0141 333 0238Facebook : Justice and Peace Scotland Twitter : @JandPScotland2. A background briefing on the Calais camp is shown below.ENDSPeter Kearney Director Catholic Media Office 5 St. Vincent Place Glasgow G1 2DH 0141 221 116807968 122291 pk@scmo.org www.scmo.orgBriefingBackground(This background summary is taken from the Human Rights Watch report ‘Like Living in Hell’; Police abuses against child and adult migrants in Calais, July 2017 .)Until the end of October 2016, a sprawling, squalid shantytown on the edge of Calais, known colloquially as “the Jungle,” held between 6,000 and 10,000 refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants, including many unaccom...