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The Bishops of Scotland as part of their "Ad Limina" (five yearly) visit to Rome, this morning enjoyed a private audience with Pope John Paul II. The audience followed a Mass in the Pope's private chapel, which the Bishops concelebrated with the Pope. Also present were 11 seminarians as well as the rector and staff of the Scots College in Rome.

In his address to the Pope, Archbishop Keith O'Brien, President of the Bishops' Conference of Scotland said;

"your Holiness, our first thought as the Bishops of Scotland is to thank you for your twenty-five years of service as Pope and to indicate to you that we look forward to the celebrations which will take place in Rome later this year as well as to our own diocesan thanksgiving and celebrations"

Archbishop O'Brien, referring to the almost 700 year old Declaration of Arbroath, sent in 1320 to Pope John 22nd added, "Today we retrace its path and despite the passing of the centuries what we seek has little changed: the direction and guidance of the Supreme Pontiff in the life of our Church in Scotland." Referring to the forthcoming Scottish Parliament elections he said;

"We know that our Catholic community plays an important part in the life of
our country. With elections soon to take place in our country we will urge
Catholics to play their part and be guided by their conscience when deciding how to vote."

In conclusion he added;
"We thank you for your efforts to achieve peaceful solutions in the various trouble spots in the world at this present time. Together with leaders of other Churches, and with members of other Faiths, we appeal for world peace at this present time, our particular concern being the situation in Iraq."

In his reply, the Pope said;

"The reports you have brought from your various Dioceses attest to the new and demanding situations which represent pastoral challenges for the Church (in Scotland) today. In Scotland, as in many lands evangelised centuries ago and steeped in Christianity, there no longer exists the reality of a "Christian society", that is, a society which, despite human weaknesses and failings, takes the Gospel as the explicit measure of its life and values. Rather, modern civilisation, although highly developed from the standpoint of technology, is often stunted in its inner depths by a tendency to exclude God or keep him at a distance."

He called for, a "new evangelisation" which "must be marked by hope" and urged the Bishops, in their work, saying; "As shepherds of souls, you should never let yourselves become discouraged in your efforts to direct the whole of Christian life and the entire Christian community ever further along the path of holiness."

He added; "Together with men and women of other religious beliefs and with people of good will with whom they share common values and principles, your Catholic communities are called to work for the advancement of society and for the peaceful coexistence of peoples and cultures."

On the importance of supporting the family and helping asylum seekers, the Pope said;  
"Joint efforts on the part of Bishops, priests, deacons, Religious and laity are essential for addressing issues of grave concern not only for the Church but for the whole of Scottish society. Marriage and family life represent two areas where such co-operation is not only advisable but necessary: in this regard I am pleased to note the forthcoming gathering of the Bishops of Scotland with agencies involved in these very fields. Another matter which the combined energies of all the faithful will prove particularly valuable in addressing is the welcome which your communities can give to refugees and asylum-seekers, especially through programmes aimed at assistance, education and social integration."

The Pope's remarks concluded with a blessing to the whole Catholic community of Scotland.


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NOTE:

THE FULL TEXT OF ARCHBISHOP O'BRIEN'S ADDRESS AND THE POPE'S REPLY ARE ATTACHED BELOW. PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE POPE WITH SCOTLAND'S BISHOPS IN THE GENERAL AUDIENCE ARE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST IN JPEG FORMAT. REQUESTS SHOULD BE E-MAILED TO: pk@scmo.org




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ADDRESS TO HIS HOLINESS POPE JOHN PAUL II

AD LIMINA VISIT TUESDAY 4th MARCH 2003

ARCHBISHOP O'BRIEN, PRESIDENT OF
THE BISHOPS' CONFERENCE OF SCOTLAND


Thanks to the Pope:

"Holy Father coming again on our Ad Limina visit to your Holiness, our first thought as the Bishops of Scotland is to thank you for your twenty-five years of service as Pope and to indicate to you that we look forward to the celebrations which will take place in Rome later this year as well as to our own diocesan thanksgiving and celebrations.

We are grateful for your constant handing on of the truths of the faith and especially for your pastoral visit to Scotland some twenty-one years ago.

We thank you in a special way for the pastoral documents prepared for the Third Millennium "Tertio Millennio Adveniente" and at the beginning of the New Millennium: "Novo Millennio Ineunte".

We have been proud to celebrate our own jubilees in Scotland around the time of the great jubilee having listened to your own advice: we celebrated the 900th anniversary of the death of St Margaret in 1993; the 1600th anniversary of the arrival of St Ninian in Galloway in 1997; and the 1400th anniversary of the death of St Columba on Island of Iona in 1997. During this present year we celebrate the 1400th anniversary of the death of St Mungo the Patron Saint of Glasgow. These celebrations have highlighted the pivotal role our faith has played in the life of our nation.

Although it is only five years since the Bishops of Scotland were last with you, it is almost 700 years since our illustrious predecessors in the Scottish Catholic Church begged the indulgence of your own holy predecessor John XXII. On April 6th 1320, Bernard De Linton Abbot of Arbroath dispatched under the seal of the nobles of Scotland a document to the then successor of Peter.

That document which remains here in the Vatican archives, requested: the recognition of the Kingdom of Scotland, the protection of the Holy See and the direction and guidance of the Supreme Pontiff. Centuries of war, upheaval and change have passed since that momentous plea arrived here in Rome. Today we retrace its path and despite the passing of the centuries what we seek has little changed: the direction and guidance of the Supreme Pontiff in the life of our Church in Scotland. 2.

Collaboration of Bishops of Scotland with Pope:

Since our last Ad Limina visit, we have mourned the death of Cardinal Winning. We thank you for your warm words of concern at that time and your awareness of the tremendous apostolate undertaken by the late Cardinal. You will be interested to know that the Cardinal's pro-life initiative continues to be supported by the Bishops' Conference of Scotland and we recently celebrated the birth of the 526th baby born following assistance from the scheme.

While aware of our own teaching role following your own leadership we are aware too of the call to work collaboratively with priests, permanent deacons, religious and the lay faithful. We are intensely aware of the need to work collaboratively, not only because it is the teaching of the Church, but because of the shortage of vocations to the priesthood and religious life at this present time. Formation of our lay faithful and the production of diocesan pastoral plans suited to the needs of our people are among our priorities.

Role of Catholic Church in Scotland:

We know that our Catholic community plays an important part in the life of our country. We are mindful of the doctrinal advice issued recently by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith concerning the participation of Catholics in political life. With elections soon to take place in our country we will urge Catholics to play their part and be guided by their conscience when deciding how to vote.

Our involvement in Ecumenical and Interfaith activities continues to grow at both local and national level. Together with those in other denomination " and faiths we remain anxious over the prospects for peace in Iraq. We endorse the call of the Scottish Interfaith Council to "members of our different faith traditions to pray earnestly for peace throughout the world." While as a Conference we recently called for prayers in the cause of peace and for greater observance of the great commandment of our Christian faith; to love our neighbours as ourselves".

Despite the fact that we live in an often secular and materialistic world it is heartening to realise that 74% of Scots still describe themselves as Christians.

In Scotland we value the national and cultural diversity of our country and the varied origins of its peoples. We remain committed to providing a place of safety and tolerance for those who have suffered persecution and violence elsewhere in the world and strive to welcome the "strangers in our midst" as the President of our Justice and Peace Commission Bishop John Mone did in his statement last year on asylum seekers.

We value highly our Catholic schools safeguarded by law and always deserving of our support. We will renew our support later this year with the appointment for the first time of a National Director of Catholic Education. We also renew our commitment to the young and the vulnerable in our society with the appointment of a National Co-coordinator for Child Protection and the publication of the new edition of our "Keeping Children Safe" guidelines.

3. Prayer and renewed apostolate:

Although there is that fall in vocations to the priesthood and religious life already mentioned we know that many religious orders and congregations have formed associates to share their charism and help in their apostolate at this present time.

Central to all our action is a spirit of prayer. The prayer of the Church and the Rosary including the five new mysteries of light are encouraged and prayed by our peoples and were central to our recent celebration of Catholic Education Week in Scotland.


Outreach to Europe:

In the year 2000 we were grateful for your message and blessing as we celebrated the 400th anniversary of the Scots College in Rome while this Eastertide we celebrate the 400th anniversary of the Scots College, which had formerly been in Paris.

We value this outreach to Europe and we are aware of the role of Europe in the world of today stressed in your own recent address to diplomats. We share your hope and the hope of many that developments in Europe will reflect and respect the Christian heritage of our continent.

Present world situation:

We thank you for your efforts to achieve peaceful solutions in the various trouble spots in the world at this present time. In particular, your address to the diplomats accredited to the Holy See at the beginning of the year gave us and many people throughout the world much to think about inspiring us in Scotland to renew our efforts to help achieve world peace. As mentioned earlier, as the Bishops' Conference of Scotland, we issued our own statement, as well as working with leaders of other Churches, and with members of other Faiths, in making appeals for world peace at this present time, our particular concern being the situation in Iraq.


Conclusion:

We are aware of your own heavy burdens of office and consequently renew our intention to pray for you throughout our Ad Limina visit and on our return to Scotland. May God indeed bless you in all your efforts especially in those ongoing efforts for peace in a troubled world which I have already mentioned."



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ADDRESS OF POPE JOHN PAUL II TO THE BISHOPS OF SCOTLAND

Dear Brother Bishops,
1. "Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ" (Rom 1:7). With fraternal affection I warmly welcome you, the Bishops of Scotland, on the occasion of your first visit ad Limina Apostolorum in this new millennium. Our meetings give us the opportunity to affirm once again our collegial communion and to deepen the bonds of love and peace which support and encourage us in our service of the Church of Christ. I join you in thanking God for the faith and dedication of the priests, deacons, Religious and laity whom you have been called to shepherd in love and truth. In your local communities we see the marvellous power of the Holy Spirit, "who down the centuries has drawn from the treasures of the Redemption achieved by Christ and given new life to human beings, sanctifying them so that they can repeat with Saint Paul: 'We have received.... the Spirit which is from God' (1 Cor 2:12)" (Dominum et Vivificantem, 53). It is this same Spirit who guides us into all truth (cf. Jn 16:13) and who impels us in this new millennium to start out anew, sustained by the hope which "does not disappoint" (Rom 5:5).

2. The reports you have brought from your various Dioceses attest to the new and demanding situations which represent pastoral challenges for the Church today. In fact, we may observe that in Scotland, as in many lands evangelised centuries ago and steeped in Christianity, there no longer exists the reality of a "Christian society", that is, a society which, despite human weaknesses and failings, takes the Gospel as the explicit measure of its life and values. Rather, modern civilisation, although highly developed from the standpoint of technology, is often stunted in its inner depths by a tendency to exclude God or keep him at a distance. This is what I referred to in my Apostolic Letter Tertio Millennio Adveniente as "the crisis of civilisation", a crisis which must be countered by "the civilisation of love, founded on the universal values of peace, solidarity, justice and liberty, which find their full attainment in Christ" (No. 52). The new evangelisation to which I have summoned the whole Church (cf. Novo Millennio Ineunte, 40) can prove a particularly effective instrument for helping to usher in this civilisation of love. Of course, the new evangelisation, as all authentic Christian evangelisation, must be marked by hope. For it is Christian hope that sustains the proclamation of the liberating truth of Christ, enlivens faith communities and enriches society with the values of the Gospel of life, which always upholds the dignity of the human person and enhances the common good. In this way, Christian life itself is revitalised and pastoral initiatives are more readily directed towards their one true end: holiness. In fact, holiness is an intrinsic and essential aspect of the Church: it is by holiness that both individuals and communities are configured to Christ. Through baptism, the believer enters into the holiness of God himself, being incorporated into Christ and made a dwelling place of his Spirit. Thus, holiness is a gift, but a gift which in turn becomes a task, a duty "which must shape the whole of Christian life" (Novo Millennio Ineunte, 30). It is a mark of authentic Christian discipleship, attainable by all who truly desire to follow Jesus with all their heart and all their mind and all their soul (cf. Mt 22:37).  

3. The concept of holiness should not be thought of as something extraordinary, as something outside the bounds of normal everyday life. For God calls his people to lead holy lives within the ordinary circumstances in which they find themselves: at home, in the parish, in the workplace, at school, on the playing field. There is much in society that lures people away - sometimes intentionally - from the difficult yet profoundly satisfying quest for holiness. As shepherds of souls, you should never let yourselves become discouraged in your efforts to direct the whole of Christian life and the entire Christian community ever further along the path of holiness. Formation for all your flock in practical and joyous holiness, within the context of sound, theologically informed spirituality, must therefore be a primary pastoral concern (cf. Congregation for the Clergy, Instruction The Priest, Pastor and Leader of the Parish Community, 28). It calls for the committed participation of all sectors of diocesan life. The work done by priests, deacons, Religious and laity in parishes and schools, and in the fields of health care and social service, makes an invaluable contribution to attaining the holiness of life to which all the faithful are called. It could prove particularly beneficial to enlist the active involvement of monastic communities and other communities of Consecrated Life, within the proper scope of their particular charism and apostolate, especially in projects aimed at the formation of young people in the school of holiness.  

4. An important aspect of the new evangelisation is the deeply felt need for an evangelisation of culture. Human cultures themselves are not static but are constantly changing through the contacts that people have with one another and through the new experiences which they share. The communication of values is what enables a culture to survive and flourish. Cultural context itself permeates the living out of the Christian faith, which in turn contributes to the shaping of that context. Christians are called, therefore, to bring the unchanging truth of God to every culture. And since "the community of the baptised is marked by a universality which can embrace everything", the faithful are to be helped to foster whatever is implicit in different cultures "to the point where it will be fully explicit in the light of the truth" (Fides et Ratio, 71). In societies where faith and religion are seen as something that should be restricted to the private sphere, and therefore as having no place in public or political debate, it is of even greater importance that the Christian message should be clearly understood for what it is: the Good News of truth and love which sets men and women free. When the foundations of a specific culture rest on Christianity, the voice of Christianity cannot be silenced without seriously impoverishing that culture. Moreover, if culture is the context in which the individual transcends himself, then removing the Absolute from that context, or pushing it off to one side as irrelevant, results in a dangerous fragmentation of reality and gives rise to crises, as culture will no longer be able to present to the younger generation the source of meaning and wisdom which it ultimately seeks. For this reason, Christians should be united in diakonia to society: in a true spirit of ecumenical co-operation, with your active participation, Christ's disciples must never cease to make present in all areas of life - public and private - the light which the Lord's teaching sheds upon the dignity of the human person. This is the light of truth that dispels the darkness of selfish interests and social corruption, the light that illuminates the path of just economic development for all. And Christians are not alone in the task of making this light shine ever brighter in society. Together with men and women of other religious beliefs and with people of good will with whom they share common values and principles, your Catholic communities are called to work for the advancement of society and for the peaceful coexistence of peoples and cultures. Thus inter-religious commitment and partnership is also an important vehicle for serving the human family. Indeed, when the light of truth is not allowed to shine forth in public debate, error and illusion are easily multiplied and often come to dominate in policy decisions. This situation becomes all the more critical when those who have lost or abandoned belief in God attack religion: a new strain of sectarianism can emerge which is as bitter as it is tragic, adding a further element of divisiveness within society.  

5. In the task of the new evangelisation, there is perhaps no group to which you will want to be more attentive and show more concern than your young people. They are the new generation of builders who will respond to humanity's aspiration for a civilisation of love marked by true freedom and authentic peace. At the World Youth Day last year in Toronto, I confidently entrusted this very duty to them and I encourage you to do the same, giving them every available assistance in meeting this challenge. From your reports, I am pleased to see that the youth of Scotland are showing enthusiasm for their faith and a steadily increasing desire to meet and work with you, their Bishops. The Church, as both mater et magistra, must guide them towards an ever fuller knowledge and experience in faith of Jesus of
Nazareth: for it is Christ alone who is the cornerstone and sure foundation of their lives; it is he alone who enables them to embrace fully the "mystery" of their lives (cf. Fides et Ratio, 15). The powerful forces of the media and the entertainment industry are aimed largely at young people, who find themselves the target of competing ideologies which seek to condition and influence their attitudes and actions. Confusion is created as youth are beset by moral relativism and religious indifferentism. How can they come to grips with the question of truth and the requirements of consistency in moral behaviour when modern culture teaches them to live as though absolute values did not exist, or tells them to be content with a vague religiosity? The widespread loss of the transcendent sense of human existence leads to failure in moral and social life. Your task, dear Brothers, is to show the tremendous relevance for contemporary men and women - and for the younger generation - of Jesus Christ and his Gospel: for it is here that the deepest human aspirations and needs find fulfilment. The saving message of Jesus Christ needs to be heard anew in all its freshness and power, so that it can be fully experienced and savoured!  

6. In speaking of the new evangelisation, we are not presenting a "new programme" but taking up once more the call of the Gospel as embodied in the living Tradition of the Church. Nevertheless the revitalisation of Christian life does require pastoral initiatives adapted to the actual circumstances of each community, built upon dialogue and shaped by the participation of the various sectors of God's holy people. Joint efforts on the part of Bishops, priests, deacons, Religious and laity are essential for addressing issues of grave concern not only for the Church but for the whole of Scottish society. Marriage and family life represent two areas where such co-operation is not only advisable but necessary: in this regard I am pleased to note the forthcoming gathering of the Bishops of Scotland with agencies involved in these very fields. Another matter which the combined energies of all the faithful will prove particularly valuable in addressing is the welcome which your communities can give to refugees and asylum-seekers, especially through programmes aimed at assistance, education and social integration. Similarly, the process of consultation and planning upon which you embarked in respect to the question of Scottish seminaries shows the importance of a collaborative approach in dealing with urgent matters relating to the Church at the national, diocesan or local level.  

7. Priestly formation of course remains one of your highest priorities. It is essential that candidates to the priesthood should be firmly grounded in a relationship of deep communion and friendship with Jesus the Good Shepherd (cf. Pastores Dabo Vobis, 42). Without this personal relationship, through which we "talk heart to heart with the Lord" (Instruction The Priest, Pastor and Leader of the Parish Community, 27), the quest for holiness, which marks the priesthood as a life of intimacy with God, would be absent and not only the individual priest but the entire community would be impoverished. Today more than ever the Church needs holy priests whose daily journey of conversion inspires in others the desire to seek the holiness which the whole People of God is called to pursue (cf. Lumen Gentium, 39). Men in formation for priesthood, as they prepare to be instruments and disciples of Christ the eternal priest, must therefore receive every assistance in striving for a life truly marked by poverty, chastity and humility, in imitation of Christ, the Eternal High Priest, of whom they are to become living icons (cf. Pastores Dabo Vobis, 33). In this same context, we may note that the permanent formation of the clergy is rightly viewed as an integral part of priestly life. In my Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation Pastores Dabo Vobis, I have already commented on and further articulated the Second Vatican Council's call for post-seminary training (cf. Optatam Totius, 22). Without repeating everything said in that document, I would like to stress that "the ongoing formation of priests, whether diocesan or religious, is the natural and absolutely necessary continuation of the process of building priestly personality" (No. 71). I urge you always to look upon your priests as "sons and friends" (Christus Dominus, 16) and to take their welfare to heart in the human, spiritual, intellectual and pastoral aspects of their priestly life: be close to them, listen to them and encourage fraternity and fellowship among them.  

8. Dear Brothers, these are some of the thoughts which your visit to the tombs of the Apostles brings to mind. With thanksgiving and affection I share these reflections with you and encourage each of you in your role as "a true father" to your people, in the image of the Good Shepherd "who knows his sheep and whose sheep know him" (cf. Jn 10:14). I assure you of my prayers as you "preach the word in season and out of season, convincing, rebuking and exhorting, with unfailing patience and teaching" (cf. 2 Tim 4:2). Yours is the sublime duty of proclaiming the Good News of salvation in Jesus Christ: fulfil this duty in the confident knowledge that the Holy Spirit continues always to guide and enlighten you. The message of hope and life which you announce will not fail to evoke fresh fervour and a renewed commitment to Christian living in Scotland. In this Year of the Rosary, I commend you to Mary, "Star of the New Evangelisation", that she may sustain you in pastoral wisdom, strengthen you in fortitude and enkindle in your hearts love and compassion. To you and the priests, deacons, Religious, and lay faithful of your Dioceses, I cordially impart my Apostolic Blessing.


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ENDS

Peter Kearney
Catholic Media Office
0141 221 1168

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Church highlights vital work at Holyrood exhibition

| 26th November 2018 | Blogging

Monday 26 November 2018     CALL NOTICE     Tomorrow evening (Tuesday 27 November) the Catholic Bishops of Scotland will join members of Parliament at a special exhibition in Holyrood to mark the significant contribution of the Church to Scottish society and beyond.     The event, sponsored by Elaine Smith MSP, highlights the extensive work carried out by agencies and commissions of the Bishops’ Conference of Scotland and its associated organisations.     Bishop Hugh Gilbert, President of the Bishops Conference of Scotland said:     “The bishops of Scotland are very grateful to Elaine Smith, MSP, for sponsoring this event and to Aileen Campbell, Cabinet Secretary for Communities and Local Government, for her support. The Church in Scotland welcomes this opportunity to showcase at least something of what we do. The Church is a world-wide, complex and many-faceted institution but in the end, it is people; names, faces, bodies and souls. It is people helping people, not just from cradle to grave, but from before birth to after death, and everything in between. What we could never do as individuals we can do together from prayer to food banks, from the kind word to the very hands-on practical, from here to places in the world hit by disaster or oppression. It’s often parallel or complementary to the social provision of Government and the many agencies of civil society and the good works of our fellow-Christians of other denominations.”     Bishop Gilbert added;     “The word ‘Catholic’ means universal. And I think all of what will be on display at the special exhibition in Holyrood reflects our desire to reach out and create unity. At our best, all we want to be is at the service of each and every human being, created in the image and likeness of God, endowed with an innate dignity and inalienable rights, which neither we nor the law nor government create, but which we can strive to recognise and serve.”     Elaine Smith, MSP, said;     “Having hosted the first ever mass at the Scottish Parliament this year during Holy Week, I am now delighted to sponsor this prestigious event, showcasing the vital charitable and valuable community work undertaken by the Catholic Church.”     Agencies in attendance include Blairs Museum which houses a collection of church textiles, sacred silver and paintings belonging to the Church and Missio Scotland which provides financial support to communities in mission countries.     Other lay catholic organisations such as The Society of St Vincent de Paul (SSVP), which seeks to combat poverty and promote social justice, will also be present. In 2015/16, its 2,000 members carried out 53,493 home visits, 12,261 hospital visits and financially assisted 6,196 families across Scotland’s eight Catholic dioceses.     ENDS     Peter Kearney Director Catholic Media Office 5 St. Vincent Place Glasgow G1 2DH 0141 221 1168 07968 122291 pk@scmo.org www.scmo.org     Note to editors:     You are invited to send a reporter/photographer/camera crew to the Scottish Parliament on Tuesday 27 November at 6pm.   The relics of Saint Andrew, patron saint of Scotland, will also be welcomed to the Scottish Parliament for the evening from the National shrine of St Andrew, St Mary’s Cathedral, Edinburgh.   Students from Holy Rood Secondary School, Edinburgh will provide musical entertainment on the night.   All of Scotland’s eight Catholic Bishops will be in attendance.   Images will be available from the Scottish Catholic Media Office at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/139632090@N07/albums/with/72157666531058155     A full list of exhibitors is shown below:   The Anscombe Bioethics Centre - The Anscombe Bioethics Centre (www.bioethics.org.uk) is a Catholic academic institute that engages with the moral questions arising in health care and medical research.    Blairs Museum - House...